What forces are you applying?

Physics

INTRODUCTION

In physics, a force is any interaction on an object that will result in the movement of another object, i.e. is any interaction that will change the motion of an object (push or pull). Whenever there is an interaction between two objects, there is a force upon each one of them. A force only exists because of interaction.

A force magnitude and direction, making a vector quantity. A force is symbolized with the letter F, and it is measured in the SI unit of Newtons.

Newton’s second law describes that when a constant force acts of a mass, it causes the acceleration of it, meaning the change in its velocity, at a steady rate. Newton’s second law of motion in equation form is:

a=F/ m

The more familiar form of the equation is: FN =m X a

 

This WebQuest can be used as part of a Physics course.

 

Table 1: Types of Forces

Type of Force

Description

Applied Force

A force that is applied to an object by someone or something.

Gravitational Force

The force with which the Earth, the moon and other massive objects attract another object towards themselves. All objects on Earth experience a force of gravity that is directed towards the centre of the Earth (downwards).

Normal Force

It is the support force exerted upon an object that is in contact with another steady object.

Frictional Force

It is the force applied by a surface while an object moves or tries to move across it.

Air Resistance Force

It is a type of frictional force acting upon objects, however, when they are travelling through air.

Tension Force

It is the type of force that is carried via a string, a rope, a cable or a wire when it is pulled by forces from opposite ends.

Spring Force

It is the force applied by a compressed or stretched spring upon any object attached to it.

 

Figure 1: Newton’s second law of motion. Source: https://courses.lumenlearning.com/physics/chapter/4-3-newtons-second-law-of-motion-concept-of-a-system/

TASK

The aim of this WebQuest is to learn and understand the seven types of forces, providing students the essential knowledge for them to use in order to be able to solve everyday problems. By the end of this course, students will be able to understand what a force is and its seven types. Also, they will understand Newton’s second law of motion and its application to determine the weight of something.

PROCESS

Step 1: Complete this table with the different types of forces

Search the internet and YouTube to find videos explaining the different types of forces based on Table 1 of this web quest. Then identify 4 forces you have usually around you and complete the table below.

You may need to watch more than one video and more than once to answer the table’s questions.

#

TYPE OF FORCE

DEFINITION

EXAMPLE

PICTURE

1.      

       

2.      

       

3.      

       

4.      

       

 

Step 2: Impacts of forces

In this step, we will try to explore the impacts of a specific force on an object with small home experiments.

Complete the table by answering the questions.

Experiment

Question

Type of force

Take a ball and sit on it.

What do you observe on the ball shape?

What type of force do you apply?

Take a thread and tie the one edge on a table. Pull slowly the rope form the other edge. Pull it as hard as you can.

What do you observe on the thread?

What type of force/forces do you apply?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now try to fill in the above table with your own experiments!

CONCLUSION

This WebQuest aims at understanding forces in physics and its seven types, and in the application of these forces to solve everyday problems.

Students are expected to develop their understanding of Newton’s laws of motion, emphasising the second law. It is a necessary and highly beneficial course that can be used later in life to solve everyday problems.

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sCOOL-IT erasmus logo EN

The European Commission’s support for the production of this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the contents, which reflect the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

Talk To Us

t: +357 2466 40 40
f: +357 2465 00 90
escool.it@scool-it.eu

Funded by
sCOOL-IT erasmus logo EN

The European Commission’s support for the production of this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the contents, which reflect the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

Talk To Us

t: +357 2466 40 40
f: +357 2465 00 90
escool.it@scool-it.eu

Funded by
sCOOL-IT erasmus logo EN

The European Commission’s support for the production of this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the contents, which reflect the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

Talk To Us

t: +357 2466 40 40
f: +357 2465 00 90
escool.it@scool-it.eu

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